Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.400 IF 3.400
  • IF 5-year value: 3.841 IF 5-year
    3.841
  • CiteScore value: 3.71 CiteScore
    3.71
  • SNIP value: 1.472 SNIP 1.472
  • IPP value: 3.57 IPP 3.57
  • SJR value: 1.770 SJR 1.770
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 70 Scimago H
    index 70
  • h5-index value: 49 h5-index 49
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-92
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-92
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 23 Mar 2020

Submitted as: research article | 23 Mar 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

A compact, high-purity source of HONO validated by Fourier Transform Infrared and Thermal Dissociation Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy

Nicholas J. Gingerysty and Hans D. Osthoff Nicholas J. Gingerysty and Hans D. Osthoff
  • Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4

Abstract. A well-characterized source of nitrous acid vapour (HONO) is essential for accurate ambient air measurements by instruments requiring external calibration. In this work, a compact HONO source is described in which gas streams containing dilute concentrations of HONO are generated by flowing hydrochloric acid (HCl) vapour emanating from a permeation tube over continuously agitated dry sodium nitrite (NaNO2) heated to 50 ºC. Mixing ratios of HONO and potential by-products including NO, NO2 and nitrosyl chloride (ClNO) were quantified by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS). A key parameter is the concentration of HCl, which needs to be kept small (< 4 ppmv) to avoid ClNO formation. The source produces gas streams containing HONO in air in > 97 % purity relative to other nitrogen oxides. The source output is rapidly tuneable and stabilizes within 90 min. Combined with its small size and portability this source is highly suitable for calibration of HONO instruments in the field.

Nicholas J. Gingerysty and Hans D. Osthoff

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 18 May 2020)
Status: open (until 18 May 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Nicholas J. Gingerysty and Hans D. Osthoff

Nicholas J. Gingerysty and Hans D. Osthoff

Viewed

Total article views: 145 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
100 43 2 145 13 0 0
  • HTML: 100
  • PDF: 43
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 145
  • Supplement: 13
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 0
Views and downloads (calculated since 23 Mar 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 23 Mar 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 141 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 141 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 05 Apr 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The generation of clean calibration gases is critical for accurate ambient air measurements. Here, we describe a source of HONO vapor dynamically generated from reaction of HCl and NaNO2. The output was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and thermal dissociation cavity ring-down spectroscopy (TD-CRDS) and was stable, tuneable, and > 97 % pure. We show how generation of unwanted side products (NO, NO2, and ClNO) can be avoided.
The generation of clean calibration gases is critical for accurate ambient air measurements....
Citation