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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-26
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-26
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 07 May 2020

Submitted as: research article | 07 May 2020

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This preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

TomoSim: a tomographic simulator for DOAS

Rui Valente de Almeida1,2, Nuno Matela3, and Pedro Vieira1 Rui Valente de Almeida et al.
  • 1Physics Department, FCT NOVA, Caparica, Portugal
  • 2Compta SA, Lisbon, Portugal
  • 3University of Lisbon - Biomedical Engineering and Biophysics Institute, Portugal

Abstract. TomoSim comes as part of project ATMOS, a miniaturised DOAS tomographic atmospheric evaluation device, designed to fit a small drone. During the development of the project, it became necessary to write a simulation tool for system validation. TomoSim is the answer to this problem. The software has two main goals: to mathematically validate the tomographic acquisition method; and to allow some adjustments to the system before reaching final product stages. This measurement strategy was based on a drone performing a sequential trajectory and gathering projections arranged in fan beams, before using some classical tomographic methods to reconstruct a spectral image. The team tested three different reconstruction algorithms, all of which were able to produce an image, validating the team's initial assumptions regarding the trajectory and acquisition strategy. All algorithms were assessed on their computational performance and their ability for reconstructing spectral images, using two phantoms, one of which custom made for this purpose. In the end, the team was also able to uncover certain limitations of the TomoSim approach that should be addressed before the final stages of the system.

Rui Valente de Almeida et al.

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Rui Valente de Almeida et al.

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Latest update: 03 Jun 2020
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Short summary
Air pollution is quite literally one of the most present concerns of modern day Western societies. It is widely recognized (namely by the European Union) that technology plays a very important role in the fighting of this problem. One of such technologies is the spectroscopic measurement of air pollutant concentration known as DOAS. In this paper, the technique is applied with an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, using tomographic techniques to map pollutant concentration in two dimensions.
Air pollution is quite literally one of the most present concerns of modern day Western...
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