Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.400 IF 3.400
  • IF 5-year value: 3.841 IF 5-year
    3.841
  • CiteScore value: 3.71 CiteScore
    3.71
  • SNIP value: 1.472 SNIP 1.472
  • IPP value: 3.57 IPP 3.57
  • SJR value: 1.770 SJR 1.770
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 70 Scimago H
    index 70
  • h5-index value: 49 h5-index 49
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-24
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-24
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 28 Jan 2020

Submitted as: research article | 28 Jan 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

Single-photon laser-induced fluorescence detection of nitric oxide at sub-parts per trillion mixing ratios

Andrew W. Rollins1, Pamela S. Rickly1,2, Ru-Shan Gao1, Thomas B. Ryerson1, Steven S. Brown1, Jeff Peischl1,2, and Ilann Bourgeois1,2 Andrew W. Rollins et al.
  • 1NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Chemical Sciences Division
  • 2Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado Boulder

Abstract. We describe a newly developed single-photon laser-induced fluorescence sensor for measurements of nitric oxide (NO) in the atmosphere. Rapid tuning of a narrow-band laser on and off of a rotationally resolved NO spectral feature and detection of the red-shifted fluorescence provides for interference-free direct measurements of NO with a detection limit of 1 pptv for 1 second of integration, or 0.3 pptv for 10 seconds of integration. The instrument was deployed on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the NASA FIREX-AQ experiment during July–September of 2019 and provided more than 140 hours of NO measurements over 22 flights, demonstrating the ability of this instrument to operate routinely and autonomously. Comparisons with a seasoned chemiluminescence sensor during FIREX-AQ in a variety of chemical environments provides validation and confidence of the accuracy of this technique.

Andrew W. Rollins et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 24 Mar 2020)
Status: open (until 24 Mar 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Andrew W. Rollins et al.

Andrew W. Rollins et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 227 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
148 77 2 227 0 5
  • HTML: 148
  • PDF: 77
  • XML: 2
  • Total: 227
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 5
Views and downloads (calculated since 28 Jan 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 28 Jan 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 132 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 132 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 17 Feb 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Nitric oxide (NO) is a key atmospheric constituent controlling atmospheric oxidation chemistry and tropospheric ozone formation. Existing instrumentation capable of quantifying NO at very low mixing ratios is uncommon and typically relies on chemiluminescence. We describe and demonstrate a new laser-based technique (LIF) with significant practical and technical advantages to CL. LIF is expected to allow for advances in understanding of atmospheric radical chemistry.
Nitric oxide (NO) is a key atmospheric constituent controlling atmospheric oxidation chemistry...
Citation