Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.400 IF 3.400
  • IF 5-year value: 3.841 IF 5-year
    3.841
  • CiteScore value: 3.71 CiteScore
    3.71
  • SNIP value: 1.472 SNIP 1.472
  • IPP value: 3.57 IPP 3.57
  • SJR value: 1.770 SJR 1.770
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 70 Scimago H
    index 70
  • h5-index value: 49 h5-index 49
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-2
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2020-2
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 27 Jan 2020

Submitted as: research article | 27 Jan 2020

Review status
This preprint is currently under review for the journal AMT.

First Observations of the McMurdo-South Pole Ionospheric HF Channel

Alex Timothy Chartier1, Juha Vierinen2, and Geonhwa Jee3 Alex Timothy Chartier et al.
  • 1Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, USA
  • 2University of Tromsø, Norway
  • 3Korea Polar Research Institute, Korea

Abstract. We present the first observations from a new low-cost oblique ionosonde located in Antarctica. The transmitter is located at McMurdo Station, Ross Island and the receiver at Amundsen-Scott Station, South Pole. The system was demonstrated successfully in March 2019, with the experiment yielding over 30 000 ionospheric echoes over a two-week period. These data indicate the presence of a stable E-layer and a sporadic and variable F-layer with dramatic spread-F of sometimes more than 500 km (in units of virtual height). The most important ionospheric parameter, NmF2, validates well against the Jang Bogo VIPIR ionosonde (observing more than 1000 km away). GPS-derived TEC data from the MIDAS algorithm can be considered necessary but insufficient to predict 7.2 MHz propagation between McMurdo and South Pole, yielding a true positive in 40 % of cases and a true negative in 73 % of cases. The success of this pilot experiment at a total grant cost of $116k and an equipment cost of ~$15k indicates that a large multi-static network could be built to provide unprecedented observational coverage of the Antarctic ionosphere.

Alex Timothy Chartier et al.

Interactive discussion

Status: open (until 23 Mar 2020)
Status: open (until 23 Mar 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Alex Timothy Chartier et al.

Data sets

Data for "First Observations of the McMurdo-South Pole Ionospheric HF Channel" A. T. Chartier https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3478267

Model code and software

AMT paper release A. T. Chartier https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3627025

Alex Timothy Chartier et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 147 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
87 60 0 147 0 1
  • HTML: 87
  • PDF: 60
  • XML: 0
  • Total: 147
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jan 2020)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jan 2020)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 85 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 85 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Saved

No saved metrics found.

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 17 Feb 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
A high-frequency radio system has been developed and deployed to Antarctica to develop new insights into the southern high-latitude ionosphere. The transmitter at McMurdo Station cycled through 12 frequencies each minute, and the receiver at South Pole Station (1356 km great circle distance from McMurdo) recorded which frequencies were received. This allowed for the estimation of maximum usable frequency. Reflection height was estimated based on the signal's time-of-flight.
A high-frequency radio system has been developed and deployed to Antarctica to develop new...
Citation