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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-78
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-78
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 06 Mar 2019

Research article | 06 Mar 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

MEMS-based condensation particle counter for real-time monitoring of airborne ultrafine particles at a point of interest

Seong-Jae Yoo1, Hong-Beom Kwon1, Ui-Seon Hong1, Dong-Hyun Kang2, Sang-Myu Lee1, Jangseop Han1, Jungho Hwang1, and Yong-Jun Kim1 Seong-Jae Yoo et al.
  • 1School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, 03722, Republic of Korea
  • 2Micro Nano Fab Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, 02792, Republic of Korea

Abstract. We present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based condensation particle counter (CPC) for sensitive and precise monitoring of airborne ultrafine particles (UFPs) at a point of interest that is portable, inexpensive, and accurate. The proposed system consists of two main parts: a MEMS-based condensation chip that grows UFPs to micro-sized droplets and a miniature optical particle counter (OPC) that singly counts grown droplets with the light scattering method. A conventional conductive cooling–type CPC is miniaturized through MEMS technology and the 3D printing technique, and the essential elements for growing droplets are integrated on a single glass slide. The proposed system is much more compact (75 mm × 130 mm × 50 mm), lightweight (205 g), and power-efficient (2.7 W) than commercial CPCs. In quantitative experiments, the results indicated that the proposed system can detect UFPs as small as 13.4 nm by growing them to micro-sized (3.16 µm) droplets. The proposed system measured the UFP number concentration with high accuracy (deviation within 4.1 %), and its detectable concentration range of 7.99–7200 N cm−3. Thus, the proposed system can potentially be used for UFP monitoring in both low-concentration (e.g., air filtration system, high-precision industries utilizing cleanrooms) and high-concentration (e.g., indoor/outdoor atmospheres) environments.

Seong-Jae Yoo et al.
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Seong-Jae Yoo et al.
Seong-Jae Yoo et al.
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Short summary
We present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based condensation particle counter (CPC) for sensitive and precise monitoring of airborne ultrafine particles (UFPs) at a point of interest that is portable, inexpensive, and accurate. A CPC is miniaturized through MEMS technology and the 3D printing technique. Thus, the proposed system can potentially be used for UFP monitoring at various locations, such as high-precision industrial and indoor/outdoor atmospheres.
We present a microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based condensation particle counter (CPC) for...
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