Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.400 IF 3.400
  • IF 5-year value: 3.841 IF 5-year
    3.841
  • CiteScore value: 3.71 CiteScore
    3.71
  • SNIP value: 1.472 SNIP 1.472
  • IPP value: 3.57 IPP 3.57
  • SJR value: 1.770 SJR 1.770
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 70 Scimago H
    index 70
  • h5-index value: 49 h5-index 49
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-349
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-349
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 04 Nov 2019

Submitted as: research article | 04 Nov 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

Performance of SIFT-MS and PTR-MS in the measurement of volatile organic compounds at different humidities

Ann-Sophie Lehnert1,2, Thomas Behrendt1, Alexander Ruecker1, Georg Pohnert2, and Susan E. Trumbore1 Ann-Sophie Lehnert et al.
  • 1Department of Biogeochemical Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, 07745 Jena, Germany
  • 2Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University, 07743 Jena, Germany

Abstract. As direct real-time analysis techniques, Selective Ion Flow Tube Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) and Proton-Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) provide on-line measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Both techniques are widely-used across several disciplines, e.g. atmospheric chemistry, food science and medicine. However, the humidity of the sampled air greatly influences the quantified mixing ratio, and must be accounted for in the calibration of both platforms. Here we present both an evaluation of calibration functions taking account for humidity and a side-by-side comparison of the performance of the two instruments based upon a calibration of 15 different VOCs over a relative humidity range from 0–90 % at 25 °C. While we made several improvements to a Voice 200 ultra SIFT-MS instrument to reduce background levels, overall detection limits for a PTR-QMS 500 are an order of magnitude lower. Sensitivity (here defined as the slope of the calibration curve) was higher for the SIFT-MS, and its calibration was more robust against humidity compared to PTR-MS. Thus, PTR-MS is the method of choice for simple, low-concentration, low-humidity analyses with a limited number of compounds whereas SIFT-MS is better-suited for more complex systems with varying humidity like our experiments investigating the change in VOC emissions of soils during dryout.

Ann-Sophie Lehnert et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 01 Jan 2020)
Status: open (until 01 Jan 2020)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Ann-Sophie Lehnert et al.
Data sets

Raw data for "Performance of SIFT-MS and PTR-MS in the measurement of volatile organic compounds at different humidities" A.-S. Lehnert, T. Behrendt, A. Ruecker, G. Pohnert, and S. E. Trumbore https://doi.org/10.17617/3.2u

Ann-Sophie Lehnert et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 158 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
112 42 4 158 18 1 2
  • HTML: 112
  • PDF: 42
  • XML: 4
  • Total: 158
  • Supplement: 18
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 2
Views and downloads (calculated since 04 Nov 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 04 Nov 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 52 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 51 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 22 Nov 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) like scents can appear and disappear quickly. For example, when a bug starts a tree, the tree releases VOCs that warn the trees around him. Thus, one needs instruments measuring their concentration in real-time and identify which VOC is measured. In our study, we compared two instruments doing that, PTR-MS and SIFT-MS. Both work similarily, but we found that the PTR-MS can measure lower concentrations, but the SIFT-MS can identify VOCs better.
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) like scents can appear and disappear quickly. For example,...
Citation