Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.400 IF 3.400
  • IF 5-year value: 3.841 IF 5-year
    3.841
  • CiteScore value: 3.71 CiteScore
    3.71
  • SNIP value: 1.472 SNIP 1.472
  • IPP value: 3.57 IPP 3.57
  • SJR value: 1.770 SJR 1.770
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 70 Scimago H
    index 70
  • h5-index value: 49 h5-index 49
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-221
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-221
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Submitted as: research article 27 Aug 2019

Submitted as: research article | 27 Aug 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

Surface flux estimates derived from UAS-based mole fraction measurements by means of a nocturnal boundary layer budget approach

Martin Kunz1, Jost V. Lavric1, Rainer Gasche2, Christoph Gerbig1, Richard H. Grant3, Frank-Thomas Koch4, Marcus Schumacher4,a, Benjamin Wolf2, and Matthias Zeeman2 Martin Kunz et al.
  • 1Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, Jena, Germany
  • 2Institute of Meteorology and Climate Research (IMK-IFU), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany
  • 3Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, USA
  • 4Deutscher Wetterdienst, Meteorologisches Observatorium Hohenpeissenberg, Germany
  • anow at: Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI), Neumayer station III, Antarctia

Abstract. The carbon exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere has a large influence on the Earth system and specifically on the climate. This exchange is therefore being studied intensively, often using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. EC measurements provide reliable results under turbulent atmospheric conditions, but under stable conditions – as they often occur at night – these measurements are known to misrepresent exchange fluxes. Nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) budgets can provide independent flux estimates under stable conditions, but their application so far has been limited by rather high cost and practical difficulties. Unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) equipped with trace gas analysers have the potential to make this method more accessible. We present the methodology and results of a proof of concept study carried out during the ScaleX 2016 campaign. Successive vertical profiles of carbon dioxide dry air mole fraction in the NBL were taken with a compact analyser carried by a UAS. We estimate an average carbon dioxide flux of 12 μmol m−2 s−1, which is plausible for nocturnal respiration in this region in summer. Transport modelling suggests that the NBL budgets represent an area on the order of 100 km2.

Martin Kunz et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: open (until 22 Oct 2019)
Status: open (until 22 Oct 2019)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
[Subscribe to comment alert] Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Martin Kunz et al.
Data sets

Measurement data, model output and analysis scripts C. Gerbig, R. H. Grant, J. V. Lavric, F.-T. Koch, and M. Kunz https://doi.org/10.17617/3.2c

Martin Kunz et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 208 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
147 58 3 208 1 3
  • HTML: 147
  • PDF: 58
  • XML: 3
  • Total: 208
  • BibTeX: 1
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 27 Aug 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 27 Aug 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 131 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 130 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 22 Sep 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
The nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) budget method enables the quantification of gas fluxes between ecosystems and the atmosphere under nocturnal stable stratification, a condition under which standard approaches struggle. However, up to now the application of the NBL method has been limited by difficulties in obtaining the required measurements. We show how an unmanned aircraft system (UAS) equipped with a carbon dioxide analyser can make this method more accessible.
The nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) budget method enables the quantification of gas fluxes...
Citation