Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.400 IF 3.400
  • IF 5-year value: 3.841 IF 5-year
    3.841
  • CiteScore value: 3.71 CiteScore
    3.71
  • SNIP value: 1.472 SNIP 1.472
  • IPP value: 3.57 IPP 3.57
  • SJR value: 1.770 SJR 1.770
  • Scimago H <br class='hide-on-tablet hide-on-mobile'>index value: 70 Scimago H
    index 70
  • h5-index value: 49 h5-index 49
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-110
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2019-110
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 11 Apr 2019

Research article | 11 Apr 2019

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

A low-cost monitor for measurement of fine particulate matter and aerosol optical depth. Part 1: Specifications and testing

Eric A. Wendt1, Casey W. Quinn2, Daniel D. Miller-Lionberg3, Jessica Tryner1, Christian L'Orange1, Bonne Ford4, Azer P. Yalin1, Jeffrey R. Pierce4, Shantanu Jathar1, and John Volckens1,2 Eric A. Wendt et al.
  • 1Department of Mechanical Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, 80523, USA
  • 2Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, 80523, USA
  • 3Access Sensor Technologies, LLC, Fort Collins, USA, 80523, USA
  • 4Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, 80523, USA

Abstract. Globally, fine particulate matter (PM2.5) air pollution is a leading contributor to death, disease, and environmental degradation. Satellite-based measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) are used to estimate PM2.5 concentrations across the world, but the relationship between satellite-estimated AOD and ground-level PM2.5 is uncertain. Sun photometers measure AOD from the Earth's surface and are often used to improve satellite data; however, reference-grade photometers and PM2.5 monitors are expensive and rarely co-located. This work presents the development and validation of the Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth (AMOD) sampler, an inexpensive and compact device that simultaneously measures PM2.5 mass and AOD and was designed specifically to be used in citizen science campaigns. The AMOD utilizes a low-cost light-scattering sensor in combination with a gravimetric filter measurement to quantify ground-level PM2.5. Aerosol optical depth is measured using optically filtered photodiodes at four discrete wavelengths. Field validation studies revealed agreement within 10 % for AOD values measured between co-located AMOD and AErosol RObotics NETwork (AERONET) monitors and for PM2.5 mass measured between co-located AMOD and EPA Federal Equivalent Method (FEM) monitors. These results demonstrate that the AMOD can quantify AOD and PM2.5 accurately at a fraction of the cost of existing reference monitors.

Eric A. Wendt et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: final response (author comments only)
Status: final response (author comments only)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Eric A. Wendt et al.
Eric A. Wendt et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 363 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
261 101 1 363 21 0 1
  • HTML: 261
  • PDF: 101
  • XML: 1
  • Total: 363
  • Supplement: 21
  • BibTeX: 0
  • EndNote: 1
Views and downloads (calculated since 11 Apr 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 11 Apr 2019)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 204 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 202 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 26 Jun 2019
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
We introduce a low-cost, compact device (Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth [AMOD] sampler) that can be used by citizen scientists to measure air quality. Our paper discusses the development and different components for measuring aerosols. It also shows that measurements made by the AMOD next to reference-grade monitors agreed within 10 %. Coupled with the cost of these instruments, this agreement demonstrates that the AMOD can be widely deployed to monitor air quality by citizen scientists.
We introduce a low-cost, compact device (Aerosol Mass and Optical Depth [AMOD] sampler) that can...
Citation