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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2018-90
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 24 Oct 2018

Research article | 24 Oct 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

Comparison of flux gradient and chamber techniques to measure soil N2O emissions

Mei Bai1, Helen Suter1, Shu Kee Lam1, Thomas K. Flesch2, and Deli Chen1 Mei Bai et al.
  • 1Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
  • 2Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada

Abstract. Improving the direct field measurement techniques to quantify gases emissions from the large agriculture farm is challenging. We compared nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions measured with static chambers to those from a newly developed micrometeorological flux gradient (FG) approach. Measurements were made at a vegetable farm following chicken manure application. The FG calculations were made with a single open-path Fourier transform infrared (OP-FTIR) spectrometer (height of 1.45m) deployed in a slant-path configuration: sequentially aimed at retro reflectors at heights of 0.8 and 1.8m above ground. Hourly emissions were measured with the FG technique, but once a day between 10:00 and 13:00 with chambers. We compared the concurrent emission ratios (FG/Chambers) between these two techniques, and found N2O emission rates from celery crop farm measured at mid-day by FG were statistically higher (1.4 times) than those from the chambers measured at the same time. Our results suggest the OP-FTIR slant-path FG configuration worked well in this study: it was sufficiently sensitive to detect the N2O gradients over our site, giving high temporal resolution N2O emissions corresponding to a large measurement footprint.

Mei Bai et al.
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Short summary
Improving the direct field measurement techniques to quantify gases emissions from the large agriculture farm is challenging. We measured nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions with static chambers and flux gradient (FG) approaches following chicken manure application. The concurrent emission ratios (FG/Chambers) showed N2O fluxes measured by FG were 1.4 times higher than those from the chambers. This study will provide important information to be used as reference for agricultural GHG measurement.
Improving the direct field measurement techniques to quantify gases emissions from the large...
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