Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.248 IF 3.248
  • IF 5-year value: 3.650 IF 5-year 3.650
  • CiteScore value: 3.37 CiteScore 3.37
  • SNIP value: 1.253 SNIP 1.253
  • SJR value: 1.869 SJR 1.869
  • IPP value: 3.29 IPP 3.29
  • h5-index value: 47 h5-index 47
  • Scimago H index value: 60 Scimago H index 60
Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2018-74
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2018-74
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 03 Apr 2018

Research article | 03 Apr 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript for further review has not been submitted.

Potential improvements in global carbon flux estimates from a network of laser heterodyne radiometer measurements of column carbon dioxide

Paul I. Palmer1,2, Emily L. Wilson3, Geronimo L. Villanueva3, Giuliano Liuzzi3,4, Liang Feng1, Anthony J. DiGregorio3,5, Jianping Mao3,6, Lesley Ott3, and Bryan Duncan3 Paul I. Palmer et al.
  • 1National Centre for Earth Observation, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  • 2School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  • 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA
  • 4Department of Physics, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016, USA
  • 5Science Systems and Applications, Inc., Lanham, MD 20706, USA
  • 6Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20740, USA

Abstract. Abstract. We present Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to evaluate the impact of a new network of ground-based miniaturized laser heterodyne radiometer (mini-LHR) instruments that measure atmospheric column-averaged carbon dioxide (XCO2) with high precision (1ppm). A particular strength of this passive measurement approach is its insensitivity to clouds and aerosols due to its direct sun pointing and narrow field-of-view (0.2 degrees). Developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), these portable, low-cost mini-LHR instruments were designed to operate in tandem with the sun photometers used by the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). This partnership allows us to leverage the existing framework of AERONET's 500+ site global ground network, as well as provide simultaneous measurements of aerosols that are known to be a major source of error in retrievals of XCO2 from passive nadir-viewing satellite observations. We show using the global 3-D GEOS-Chem chemistry transport model that a deployment of 50 mini-LHRs to strategically-selected AERONET sites significantly improves our knowledge of global and regional land-based CO2 fluxes. This improvement varies seasonally and ranges from 58% to 81% over southern lands, 47% to 76% over tropical lands, 71% to 92% over northern lands, and 64% to 91% globally. While column CO2 measurements from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) provide a similar level of improvement, it is limited to the northern hemisphere where the majority of the 23 TCCON sites are located. We show that supplementing TCCON's existing network with mini-LHR instruments would provide significant improvements in northern hemispheric summertime CO2 flux estimates which would especially benefit the northernmost latitudes of North America and Eurasia where satellites and ground-based networks have limited data coverage. Our studies suggest that the mini-LHR network could also play a substantive role in reducing carbon flux uncertainty in Arctic and tropical systems by filling in geographical gaps in measurements left by ground-based networks and space-based observations. A realized network would also provide necessary data for the quinquennial global stocktakes that form part of the Paris Agreement.

Paul I. Palmer et al.
Interactive discussion
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Interactive discussion
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
Status: closed (peer review stopped)
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Paul I. Palmer et al.
Paul I. Palmer et al.
Viewed  
Total article views: 466 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
362 97 7 466 6 3
  • HTML: 362
  • PDF: 97
  • XML: 7
  • Total: 466
  • BibTeX: 6
  • EndNote: 3
Views and downloads (calculated since 03 Apr 2018)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 03 Apr 2018)
Viewed (geographical distribution)  
Total article views: 467 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 463 with geography defined and 4 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Cited  
Saved  
No saved metrics found.
Discussed  
No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 18 Dec 2018
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
We describe the potential impact of a new, low-cost, portable ground instrument (the mini-LHR) that measures methane and carbon dioxide in the atmospheric column. This region is key for quantifying the global carbon budget but has geographical gaps in measurements left by ground-based networks and space-based observations. A deployment of 50 mini-LHRs would add new data products in the Amazon, the Arctic and southern Asia and significantly improve knowledge of regional and global carbon budgets.
We describe the potential impact of a new, low-cost, portable ground instrument (the mini-LHR)...
Citation
Share