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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2018-346
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2018-346
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 13 Nov 2018

Research article | 13 Nov 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

Identification of Gas-phase Pyrolysis Products in a Prescribed Fire: Seminal Detections Using Infrared Spectroscopy for Naphthalene, Methyl Nitrite, Allene, Acrolein and Acetaldehyde

Nicole K. Scharko1, Ashley M. Oeck1, Russell G. Tonkyn1, Stephen P. Baker2, Emily N. Lincoln2, Joey Chong3, Bonni M. Corcoran3, Gloria M. Burke3, David R. Weise3, Tanya L. Myers1, Catherine A. Banach1, and Timothy J. Johnson1 Nicole K. Scharko et al.
  • 1Pacific Northwest National Laboratories, Richland, WA, USA
  • 2USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station, Missoula, MT, USA
  • 3USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Research Station, Riverside, CA, USA

Abstract. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are emitted from many sources, including wildland fire; VOCs have received heightened emphasis due to such gases' influential role in the atmosphere, as well as possible health effects. We have used extractive infrared (IR) spectroscopy on recent prescribed burns in longleaf pine stands and herein report seminal detection of five compounds using this technique. The newly reported IR detections include naphthalene, methyl nitrite, allene, acrolein and acetaldehyde. We discuss the approaches used for detection, particularly the software methods needed to fit the analyte and multiple (interfering) spectral components within the selected spectral micro-window(s). We also discuss the method's detection limits and individual species' context in terms of atmospheric chemistry.

Nicole K. Scharko et al.
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Nicole K. Scharko et al.
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Latest update: 18 Dec 2018
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Short summary
We report five species (Naphthalene, Methyl Nitrite, Allene, Acrolein and Acetaldehyde) that were detected in biomass burning fires that had been seen before in burn studies, but are reported or the first time when using infrared spectroscopy for detection.
We report five species (Naphthalene, Methyl Nitrite, Allene, Acrolein and Acetaldehyde) that...
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