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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2018-323
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 23 Oct 2018

Research article | 23 Oct 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

A novel post-processing algorithm for Halo Doppler lidars

Ville Vakkari1,2, Antti J. Manninen3, Ewan J. O'Connor1,4, Jan H. Schween5, and Pieter G. van Zyl2 Ville Vakkari et al.
  • 1Finnish Meteorological Institute, Helsinki, FI-00101, Finland
  • 2Unit for Environmental Sciences and Management, North-West University, Potchefstroom, ZA-2520, South Africa
  • 3Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, FI-00014, Finland
  • 4Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading, UK
  • 5Institute for Geophysics and Meteorology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany

Abstract. Commercially available Doppler lidars have now been proven to be efficient tools for studying winds and turbulence in the planetary boundary layer. However, in many cases low signal-to-noise ratio is still a limiting factor for utilising measurements by these devices. Here, we present a novel postprocessing algorithm for Halo Streamline Doppler lidars, which enables an improvement in sensitivity of a factor of five or more. This algorithm is based on improving the accuracy of the instrumental noise floor and it enables using longer integration times or averaging of high temporal resolution data to obtain signals down to −32dB. While this algorithm does not affect the measured radial velocity, it improves the accuracy of radial velocity uncertainty estimates and consequently the accuracy of retrieved turbulent properties. Field measurements with three different Halo Doppler lidars deployed in Finland, Greece and South Africa demonstrate how the new post-processing algorithm increases data availability for turbulent retrievals in the planetary boundary layer, improves detection of high-altitude cirrus clouds, and enables the observation of elevated aerosol layers.

Ville Vakkari et al.
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Short summary
Commercially available Doppler lidars have been proven to be efficient tools for studying winds and turbulence in the planetary boundary layer. However, in many cases low signal is still a limiting factor for utilising measurements by these devices. Here, we present a novel post-processing algorithm for Halo Streamline Doppler lidars, which enables an improvement in sensitivity of a factor of five or more.
Commercially available Doppler lidars have been proven to be efficient tools for studying winds...
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