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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2018-194
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 11 Jul 2018

Research article | 11 Jul 2018

Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

Apparatus for Dry Deposition of Aerosols on Snow

Nicholas D. Beres1,2 and Hans Moosmüller1 Nicholas D. Beres and Hans Moosmüller
  • 1Laboratory for Aerosol Science, Spectroscopy, and Optics, Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV, 89512, USA
  • 2University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV, 89512, USA

Abstract. Deposition of light absorbing aerosol on snow can drastically change the albedo of the snow surface and the energy balance of the snowpack. To study these important effects experimentally and to compare with theory, it is desirable to have an apparatus for such deposition experiments. Here, we describe a simple apparatus to generate and evenly deposit light absorbing aerosols onto a flat snow surface. Aerosols are produced (combustion aerosols) or entrained (mineral dust aerosols) and continuously transported into a deposition chamber placed on the snow surface where they deposit onto and into the snowpack, thereby modifying its surface reflectance and albedo. We demonstrate field operation of this apparatus by generating black and brown carbon combustion aerosols and entraining hematite mineral dust aerosol and depositing them on the snowpack. Changes in spectral snow reflectance is demonstrated qualitatively through pictures of snow surfaces after aerosol deposition and quantitatively by measuring hemispherical-conical reflectance spectra for the deposited areas and for adjacent snowpack in its natural state. Additional potential applications for this apparatus are mentioned and briefly discussed.

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Nicholas D. Beres and Hans Moosmüller
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Nicholas D. Beres and Hans Moosmüller
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Latest update: 18 Sep 2018
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Short summary
Particulate matter found in the atmosphere, or aerosols, can deposit on snow and ice and significantly change its reflectivity. Consequently, the timing of snow melt and snow water runoff is also changed. To study these processes, it is important to be able to deposit aerosols in a controlled manner on snow surfaces. Here, we present the design and demonstrate the use of an apparatus for deposition of common mineral dust and combustion aerosols.
Particulate matter found in the atmosphere, or aerosols, can deposit on snow and ice and...
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