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Discussion papers | Copyright
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2018-139
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 02 May 2018

Research article | 02 May 2018

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It is a manuscript under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).

Lidar temperature series in the middle atmosphere as a reference data set. Part B: Assessment of temperature observations from MLS/Aura and SABER/TIMED satellites

Robin Wing1, Alain Hauchecorne1, Philippe Keckhut1, Sophie Godin-Beekmann1, Sergey Khaykin1, and Emily M. McCullough2 Robin Wing et al.
  • 1LATMOS/IPSL, UVSQ Université Paris-Saclay, Sorbonne Université, CNRS, Guyancourt, France
  • 2Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada

Abstract. We have compared 1338 nights of Rayleigh lidar temperatures measured at L'Observatoire de Haute Provence (OHP) with co-located temperature measurements from the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) and the Sounding of the Atmosphere by Broadband Emission Radiometry instru- ment (SABER). The comparisons were conducted using data from January 2002 to January 2011 in the geographic region around the observatory (43.93°N, 5.71°E). We have found systematic differences between the temperatures measured from the ground based lidar and those measured from the satellites which suggest non-linear distortions in the satellite altitude retrievals. We see a winter stratopause cold bias in the satellite measurements with respect to the lidar (−6K for SABER and −15K for MLS), a summer mesospheric warm bias (10K near 60km), and a vertically structured bias for MLS (0 to 4K). We have corrected the stratopause height of the satellite measurements using the lidar temperatures and have seen an improvement in the comparison. The winter stratospheric relative cold bias between the lidar and SABER has been eliminated and the summer mesospheric warm bias is reduced by 6K. Stratopause altitude corrections have reduced the relative cold bias between the lidar and MLS by 4K in the early autumn and late spring.

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Latest update: 17 Aug 2018
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Short summary
We have compared 8 years of lidar temperatures to temperatures derived from the satellites SABER and MLS. We have found two major differences between these two techniques: a 10 K summer cold bias in the mesosphere and a 6 K winter warm bias near the stratopause. Additionally, the lidar-MLS comparisons show evidence of systematic layered errors with altitude. We have then corrected the stratopause height of the satellite profiles using lidar data and have seen an improvement.
We have compared 8 years of lidar temperatures to temperatures derived from the satellites SABER...
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