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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2017-421
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Research article
12 Jan 2018
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of this manuscript was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Assessing a low-cost methane sensor quantification system for use in complex rural and urban environments
Ashley Collier-Oxandale1, Michael P. Hannigan2, Joanna Gordon Casey2, Ricardo Piedrahita3, John Ortega4, Hannah Halliday5, and Jill Johnston6 1Department of Environmental Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA
2Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA
3Berkeley Air Monitoring Group, Boulder, CO, USA
4National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO, 80301, USA
5NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, 23666, USA
6Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA
Abstract. Low-cost sensors have the potential to facilitate the exploration of air quality issues on new temporal and spatial scales. Here we evaluate a low-cost sensor quantification system for methane through its use in two different deployments. The first, a one-month deployment along the Colorado Front Range includes sites near active oil and gas operations in the Denver-Julesberg basin. The second deployment in an urban Los Angeles neighborhood, an subject to complex mixture of air pollution sources including oil operations. Given its role as a potent greenhouse gas, new low-cost methods for detecting and monitoring methane may aid in protecting human and environmental health. In this paper, we assess a number of linear calibration models to convert raw sensor signals into ppm concentration values. We also examine different choices that can be made during calibration and data processing, and explore cross-sensitivities that impact this sensor type. The results illustrate the accuracy of the Figaro TGS 2600 sensor when methane is quantified from raw signals using the techniques described. The results also demonstrate the value of these tools for examining air quality trends and events on small spatial and temporal scales as well as their ability to characterize an area – highlighting their potential to provide preliminary data that can inform more targeted measurements or supplement existing monitoring networks.
Citation: Collier-Oxandale, A., Hannigan, M. P., Casey, J. G., Piedrahita, R., Ortega, J., Halliday, H., and Johnston, J.: Assessing a low-cost methane sensor quantification system for use in complex rural and urban environments, Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2017-421, in review, 2018.
Ashley Collier-Oxandale et al.
Ashley Collier-Oxandale et al.

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Short summary
Low-cost air quality sensors and air quality sensor systems have the potential to open up new ways of measuring pollutants. In this paper, we explored ways to use low-cost sensors (approximately $10 per sensor) to measure methane – a pollutant important for its contributions to climate change. We found that while these sensors will likely never replace traditional air quality monitoring methods, they can provide useful supplementary information on local pollution sources and regional trends.
Low-cost air quality sensors and air quality sensor systems have the potential to open up new...
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