Journal cover Journal topic
Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

Journal metrics

  • IF value: 3.089 IF 3.089
  • IF 5-year<br/> value: 3.700 IF 5-year
    3.700
  • CiteScore<br/> value: 3.59 CiteScore
    3.59
  • SNIP value: 1.273 SNIP 1.273
  • SJR value: 2.026 SJR 2.026
  • IPP value: 3.082 IPP 3.082
  • h5-index value: 45 h5-index 45
https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2017-30
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
31 Mar 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is a preprint. A revision of the manuscript is under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).
Spectroscopic real-time monitoring of NO2 for city scale modelling
P. Morten Hundt1, Michael Müller1, Markus Mangold1,a, Béla Tuzson1, Philipp Scheidegger1, Herbert Looser1,2, Christoph Hüglin1, and Lukas Emmenegger1 1Laboratory for Air Pollution and Environmental Technology, Empa, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland
2Institute for Aerosol and Sensor Technology, FHNW, 5210 Windisch, Switzerland
apresent address: IRsweep AG, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland
Abstract. Detailed knowledge about the urban NO2 concentration field is a key element for obtaining accurate, individual exposure estimates. These are required for improving the understanding of the impact of ambient NO2 on human health and for related air quality measures. We developed a compact and robust quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) and deployed it on a tram in the city of Zurich (Switzerland) to perform mobile real-time concentration measurements of NO2. Thorough analysis of the obtained NO2 data, for instance by comparison with data from fixed air quality monitoring (AQM) sites, revealed the instrument to be highly accurate and valuable for collection of data that can be used in statistical models for the calculation of spatio-temporally resolved NO2 concentration maps. The combination of fast mobile measurements with AQM data proved to be very suitable, but the statistical data analysis also showed that a single mobile instrument is not sufficient in the studied urban area, for mainly two reasons: (i) short residence close to sources with large short-term NO2 variations and (ii) limited representativeness of the tram tracks for the entire urban environment.

Citation: Hundt, P. M., Müller, M., Mangold, M., Tuzson, B., Scheidegger, P., Looser, H., Hüglin, C., and Emmenegger, L.: Spectroscopic real-time monitoring of NO2 for city scale modelling, Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/amt-2017-30, in review, 2017.
P. Morten Hundt et al.
P. Morten Hundt et al.
P. Morten Hundt et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 447 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
310 112 25 447 94 14 24

Views and downloads (calculated since 31 Mar 2017)

Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 31 Mar 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 447 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)

Thereof 445 with geography defined and 2 with unknown origin.

Country # Views %
  • 1

Saved

Discussed

Latest update: 24 Nov 2017
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
NO2 is a pollutant that regularly exceeds its limit values in European cities. We developed a compact, mobile laser spectrometer that measures NO2 concentrations and installed it on a tram in Zurich. Mobile operation resulted in NO2 concentration data with high spatio-temporal resolution. The data were used in combination with data from fixed AQM sites and geographic information such as traffic intensities and elevation to do statistical modeling of the NO2 concentration in the whole city.
NO2 is a pollutant that regularly exceeds its limit values in European cities. We developed a...
Share