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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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doi:10.5194/amt-2016-384
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
13 Feb 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).
Technical note: A closed chamber method to measure greenhouse gas fluxes from dry sediments
Lukas Lesmeister and Matthias Koschorreck Department Lake Research, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Magdeburg, 39114, Germany
Abstract. Greenhouse gas emissions from dry aquatic sediments are probably globally relevant. However, they are difficult to measure because of the often rocky substrate and the dynamic nature of the habitat. Here we tested the performance of different materials to seal a closed chamber to stony ground both in laboratory and field experiments. Using on-site material consistently resulted in elevated fluxes. The artefact was caused both by outgassing of the material and production of gas. The magnitude of the artefact was site dependent – the measured CO2 flux was increased between 10 and 208 %. Errors due to incomplete sealing proved to be more severe than errors due to non-inert sealing material.

Pottery clay as sealing material provided a tight sealing of the chamber to the ground and no production of gases was detected. With this approach it is possible to get reliable gas fluxes from hard-substrate sites without using a permanent collar. Our test experiments confirmed that CO2 fluxes from dry aquatic sediments are similar to CO2 fluxes from normal soils.


Citation: Lesmeister, L. and Koschorreck, M.: Technical note: A closed chamber method to measure greenhouse gas fluxes from dry sediments, Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., doi:10.5194/amt-2016-384, in review, 2017.
Lukas Lesmeister and Matthias Koschorreck
Lukas Lesmeister and Matthias Koschorreck
Lukas Lesmeister and Matthias Koschorreck

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Short summary
Greenhouse gas emissions from dry aquatic sediments are probably globally relevant. However, they are difficult to measure because of the often rocky substrate. We tested the performance of different materials to seal a closed chamber to stony ground both in laboratory and field experiments. Potery clay was a convenient sealing material while the use of on-site material produced artefacts. We confirmed that CO2 fluxes from dry aquatic sediments were similar to fluxes from normal soils.
Greenhouse gas emissions from dry aquatic sediments are probably globally relevant. However,...
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