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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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doi:10.5194/amt-2016-348
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
03 Mar 2017
Review status
This discussion paper is under review for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT).
Replacing the AMOR by the miniDOAS in the ammonia monitoring network in the Netherlands
A. J. C. Stijn Berkhout1, Daan P. J. Swart1, Hester Volten1, Lou F. L. Gast1, Marty Haaima1, Hans Verboom1,a, Guus Stefess1, Theo Hafkenscheid1, and Ronald Hoogerbrugge1 1National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven, the Netherlands
anow at: Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), P.O. Box 201, 3730 AE De Bilt, the Netherlands
Abstract. In this paper we present the continued development of the miniDOAS, an active differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument to measure ammonia concentrations in ambient air. The miniDOAS has been adapted for use in the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network. The miniDOAS replaces the life-expired continuous-flow denuder ammonia monitor (AMOR). From September 2014 to December 2015, both instruments measured in parallel before the change from AMOR to miniDOAS was made. The instruments were deployed on six monitoring stations throughout the Netherlands. We report on the results of this intercomparison.

Both instruments show a good uptime of ca. 90 %, adequate for an automatic monitoring network. Although both instruments produce minute values of ammonia concentrations, a direct comparison on short timescales such as minutes or hours does not give meaningful results, because the AMOR response to changing ammonia concentrations is slow. Comparisons between daily and monthly values show a good agreement. For monthly averages, we find a small average offset of 0.65 ± 0.28 µg m−3 and a slope of 1.034 ± 0.028, with the miniDOAS measuring slightly higher than the AMOR. The fast time resolution of the miniDOAS makes the instrument not only suitable for monitoring but also for process studies.


Citation: Berkhout, A. J. C. S., Swart, D. P. J., Volten, H., Gast, L. F. L., Haaima, M., Verboom, H., Stefess, G., Hafkenscheid, T., and Hoogerbrugge, R.: Replacing the AMOR by the miniDOAS in the ammonia monitoring network in the Netherlands, Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., doi:10.5194/amt-2016-348, in review, 2017.
A. J. C. Stijn Berkhout et al.
A. J. C. Stijn Berkhout et al.
A. J. C. Stijn Berkhout et al.

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Short summary
One of the polluting gases we measure in the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network is ammonia. We replaced the ageing instruments that we used for the past 20 years by the miniDOAS, an instrument that uses ultraviolet light to measure ammonia. We operated the old and new instruments side by side for more than a year and found them to agree well. The miniDOAS measures faster than the old instrument, this will give us more insight in how ammonia behaves in the atmosphere.
One of the polluting gases we measure in the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network is...
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