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Atmospheric Measurement Techniques An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union

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doi:10.5194/amt-2016-246
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed
under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Research article
25 Oct 2016
Review status
A revision of this discussion paper was accepted for the journal Atmospheric Measurement Techniques (AMT) and is expected to appear here in due course.
Analysis of geostationary satellite derived cloud parameters associated with high ice water content environments
Adrianus de Laat1, Eric Defer2, Julien Delanoë3, Fabien Dezitter4, Amanda Gounou5, Alice Grandin4, Anthony Guignard3, Jan Fokke Meirink1, Jean-Marc Moisselin5, and Frédéric Parol6 1KNMI, de Bilt, The Netherlands
2Laboratoire d'Aérology, CNRS/OMP Toulouse, France
3Laboratoire Atmosphère, Milieux et Observations Spatiales, UVSQ, Guyancourt, France
4AIRBUS, Toulouse, France
5Meteo France, Toulouse, France
6Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique, Université de Lille, Sciences et Technologies, Villeneuve d'Ascq, France
Abstract. We present a newly developed high ice water content mask (High IWC) based on measurements of the cloud physical properties (CPP) algorithm applied to the geostationary Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI). The mask was developed within the European High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC) project for detection of upper atmospheric high IWC, which can be a hazard for aviation.

Evaluation of the High IWC mask with satellite measurements of active remote sensors of cloud properties (CLOUDSAT/CALIPSO combined in the DARDAR product) shows that the High IWC mask can be fine-tuned for detection of high IWC values > 1 g/m3 in the DARDAR profiles. The best CPP predictors of High IWC were the condensed water path, cloud optical thickness, cloud phase, and cloud top height. The evaluation of the High IWC mask against DARDAR provided some indications that the MSG-CPP High IWC mask is more sensitive to cloud ice or cloud water in the upper part of the cloud, which is relevant for aviation purposes. Biases in the CPP results were also identified, in particular a solar zenith angle (SZA) dependence that reduces the performance of the High IWC mask for SZAs > 60°. Verification statistics show that for the detection of High IWC a trade-off has to be made between better detection of High IWC scenes and more false detections, i.e. scenes identified by the High IWC mask that do not contain IWC > 1 g/m3. However, the large majority of these detections still contain IWC values between 0.1–1 g/m3.

Comparison of the High IEC mask against results from the Rapid Developing Thunderstorm (RDT) algorithm applied to the same geostationary SEVIRI data showed that there are similarities and differences with the High IWC mask: the RDT algorithm is very capable of detection young/new convective cells and areas, whereas the High IWC mask appears to be better capable of detecting more mature and ageing convection as well as cirrus remnants.

The lack of detailed understanding what causes aviation hazards related to High IWC hampers further tuning of the High IWC mask. Additional evaluation of the High IWC mask against field campaign data should provide more information on the performance of the MSG-CPP High IWC mask and contribute to a better characterization.


Citation: de Laat, A., Defer, E., Delanoë, J., Dezitter, F., Gounou, A., Grandin, A., Guignard, A., Meirink, J. F., Moisselin, J.-M., and Parol, F.: Analysis of geostationary satellite derived cloud parameters associated with high ice water content environments, Atmos. Meas. Tech. Discuss., doi:10.5194/amt-2016-246, in review, 2016.
Adrianus de Laat et al.
Interactive discussionStatus: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version      Supplement - Supplement
 
RC1: 'Comments on amt-2016-246', Anonymous Referee #1, 27 Nov 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC1: 'Response to Referee #1', Adrianus de Laat, 31 Jan 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
 
RC2: 'Reviewer comments', Anonymous Referee #2, 04 Dec 2016 Printer-friendly Version 
AC2: 'Response to Referee #2', Adrianus de Laat, 31 Jan 2017 Printer-friendly Version Supplement 
Adrianus de Laat et al.
Adrianus de Laat et al.

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Short summary
In-flight icing is an important aviation hazard which is still poorly understood, but the overall consensus is that the presence of high ice water content is a necessary condition. For the European High Altitude Ice Crystals project a geostationary satellite-remote sensing mask has been developed for detection of atmospheric cloud environments where high ice water content is likely to occur. The mask performs satisfactory when compared against aircraft field campaign measurements.
In-flight icing is an important aviation hazard which is still poorly understood, but the...
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